Vocational training responds to needs of communities

For the 12th year in a row ten young men and women followed the vocational training at the Eva Demaya Centre. In 3 to 6 months these young people are trained to become an independent professional tailor, tinsmith, bicycle repairman and carpenter.
 
 

 
 
 
 
The students are selected by the people in their own community. After the training they will return to their village to practice their new learned profession. This way a win-win situation is created: the young people have a good perspective to become economically independent as a professional worker and the community can profit from the services they offer.
 
 
After delivering their ‘masterpiece’ as proof of fitness, this year’s training was closed in November with an festive activity at the Centre. All participants receive a certificate which indicates they successfully followed the vocational programme at The Centre.
All students receive the coveted starters kit, which contains a basis set of tools and materials for their own discipline. This makes it possible to directly start their small business without the need for investing in inventory first.
 
 

 
 
The vocational program at the Centre ran its 12th year so up till now 120 young people has a solid foundation to develop themselves to become economically productive and independent but also to grow as a person. All these years the vocational program has been very succesfull and is very much appreciated by both the young people and the communities.
Expanding the program to train more people is not possible because the centre is limited to offer the young people housing during the program.
 
For next year’s vocational training a small change will be made in the selection and assignment criteria: the young men and women can freely choose the profession they feel fits them best, the traditional division in men’s and women’s jobs will be abandoned so Eva Demaya hopes to welcome the first female carpenter!

Vocational training successful

This year’s vocational training have been closed. The to-be-tailors who were introduced to the readers in the recent newsletter, now are graduated, just like the young man who followed the education programme to be a tinsmith, bicycle repairman and carpenter
On October 15th the Centre organized a festivity to honour the students, in the presence of a large group of people.

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The vocational training is repeated yearly and is one of the pillars of the Eva Demaya Centre. The 10 youngsters – four ladies and 6 young men – stayed at the Centre for 6 month and followed a fully tended training programme. At the closing of the program and after some final exams, Jacqueline handed over their certificate of evidence.
 
 
 
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An important reason for the successful proceedings of their study, is the gift of a toolkit they each receive. Every vocational has it’s own tools, like a sewing machine, scissors, a tape measure and other indispensable materials such as fabrics and thread for the tailor and a complete carpentry outset for the carpenters.
With the tools available, the young men and women can now directly start up their own small business in their own village.

This year’s students were highly motivated, because they know all too well that the vocational training offered new chances to all those who already had the opportunity to be in the program in the earlier years.
The Eva Demaya Centre wishes them lots of good luck and success with their new vocation and finding a new (business)life in their community.

Education for vulnerable young people

Lundu CDSS 2015 (2) (Large)Every year the Eva Demaya Centre supports 35 young people attending secondary school by paying their school fees.
There is always very high demand from the community for this financial support. Eva Demaya gives priority to vulnerable young people, of whom there are many, such as children who have lost one or both parents and children with physical disabilities. In order to be chosen for school fees support, pupils must demonstrate an appetite for hard work and must take his or her studies seriously.
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Recently there has been a move to give girls in particular greater access to secondary school education.
Girls, who often have to walk long distances to secondary schools, tend to drop out of the school system in greater numbers than boys. This is mainly because girls are needed to help at home, leaving little time for study; in addition, their long treks to and from school can be exhausting and sometimes dangerous.
Community schools are now trying to foster a greater spirit of belonging by building hostels that offer accommodation for students during the school year. For girls in particular this greatly increases the chancers of being able to complete their school education successfully.

The catchment area of the Eva Demaya Centre includes eight secondary schools and supported students are spread over all of these eight schools. This school year parents pay 55 Euros in school fees per child annually. It costs an additional 110 Euros to stay in the hostels. For many families – sometimes with more than one child – these are very large amounts.Up till now, the Centre has mainly supported students staying with their families.School fees 10 2014 (5) To increase the chances – especially for the girls – of getting a good education, Eva Demaya intends to start supporting selected pupils by also paying their hostel fees. Eva Demaya hopes for your financial support to make this possible and to help young people to work for a better future.

The photos show some of the young people who – with your help and the involvement of Eva Demaya – are being supported this year with their secondary education. Another photo shows one of the newly built hostels, where boys and girls can stay during term-time.

New start of vocational training courses

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The Eva Demaya Centre’s vocational training courses for orphaned young people started its 11th edition last June. Again, youngsters are educated to be a tailor (4 girls) or a carpenter, tin smith or bicycle repairman (2 boys each).
The ten young people come from the more remote area’s of the catchment area of the Eva Demaya Centre. Their chances for economic independency are substantially enhanced with these vocational courses.
 
 
 
This year some new instructors are responsible for the day to day training courses.
Leonard Mkhandawire is training in carpentry and Gibson Ngoma is learning his men the craft of tin smithing.
Chancy Chirambo is educating the girls in tailoring. Chancy herself was educated through the Eva Demaya vocational training courses for tailoring in 2004 and is now a very successful tailor.

The photos show the ladies working with patterns and colourful fabrics, and how the gentlemen work the wood to make new tables and chairs.

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